vrijdag 28 december 2012

Dollars from the Bahamas & a school of grunts




The Bahamas' unit of currency is the Bahamian dollar ($B) which is based on the U.S. dollar. One Bahamian dollar equals 100 Bahamian cents (pennies).

As the Bahamian and U.S. dollars are equivalent (1 $B = 1 $US), residents or visitors may spend either Bahamian or U.S. dollars in the Bahamas, though outside the Bahamas, Bahamian money is not too valuable (trading at times at nearly half its face value), except as a popular collector item, so make sure to get rid of all your Bahamian dollars before you leave. (To understand more about money read this article on the gold standard. If the Bahamian politicians were honest -- and rational -- enough to implement such a program, the Bahamian dollar would be worth 20 times that of the U.S. dollar within 5 to 7 years.)
[source: thebahamasguide.com]






grunt, yellow-banded sweetlips [Credit: © Getty Images]any of about 150 species of marine fishes of the family Haemulidae (Pomadasyidae) in the order Perciformes. Grunts are found along shores in warm and tropical waters of the major oceans. They are snapperlike but lack canine teeth. They are named for the piglike grunts they can produce with their pharyngeal (throat) teeth. Some (genus Haemulon) are further characterized by bright, reddish mouth linings. Grunts are edible and valued as food, though most species are small. Some are noted for a behavioral trait in which two individuals approach and “kiss.” The purpose of this, whether sexual or aggressive, is not known.
The haemulids, although known collectively as grunts, are known individually by a number of names, among them porkfish, pigfish, sweetlips, margate, and tomtate. Among the better-known species are the blue-striped, or yellow, grunt (Haemulon sciurus), a striped, blue and yellow Atlantic fish up to 46 cm (18 inches) long; the French grunt (H. flavolineatum), a yellow-striped, silvery blue Atlantic species about 30 cm (12 inches) long; the margate (H. album), a usually pearl gray species of the western Atlantic; the pigfish (Orthopristis chrysoptera), a western Atlantic food fish, striped silvery and blue and about 38 cm (15 inches) long; the porkfish (Anisotremus virginicus), a western Atlantic reef fish that, when young, is marked with black and serves as a “cleaner,” picking parasites off larger fishes; several species of sweetlips (Plectorhynchus), which are Indo-Pacific fishes, highly variable in colouring and sometimes kept in marine aquariums; and the tomtates (Bathystoma rimator and related species), grunts found off Florida and the West Indies. [source: britannica.com]



Both cards accompanied with this great prince Harry stamp! From a set of 4 stamps (15, 50, 65 and 70c) issued in 2012 in favor of Queen Elizabeth II's diamond Jubilee, hence the reason there's a diamond depicted.

Thank you very much Niki!


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